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Molly



Apr 27, 05 - 2:28 AM
An Article for Literary Sagettes

http://www.city-journal.org/html/12_3_oh_to_be.html

I shall quote one paragraph, which ought to show why Aristasian bluestockings ought to read this:

Virginia WoolfÕs name is not normally associated with great affairs of state, of course. Quite the reverse. She regarded them with a fastidious disgust, as a vulgar distraction from the true business of life: attendance to the finer nuances of oneÕs own emotional state. Along with the other members of the Bloomsbury groupÑthat influential and endlessly chronicled little band of British aesthetes of which she was a moving spiritÑshe was dedicated to the proposition that beings as sensitive as they to the music of life ought not to be bound by gross social conventions, and that it was their duty (as well as their pleasure) to act solely upon the promptings of the sympathetic vibrations of their souls. In a demotic age, however, their justification for personal license could not long be confined to socially superior types such as themselves. Before very long, what was permissible for the elite became mandatory for hoi polloi; and when the predictable social disaster occurred, in the form of a growing underclass devoid of moral bearings, the elite that had absorbed (indeed, reveled in) BloomsburyÕs influence took the growth of the underclass as evidence that their original grudge against society and its conventions had been justified all along. The philosophy brought about the disaster, and the disaster justified the philosophy.
Miss Drusilla



Apr 27th, 2005 - 8:12 AM
Re: An Article for Literary Sagettes

How clever of you, child, to note that most deplorable of social tendencies: the trickling-down of immorality from people who ought to have known better to people who couldn't be expected to see through its emptiness. I think Miss Miralene set out the nature of the trouble even more clearly than the above when she wrote,

"The Western world had long been guided by false philosophies, and moral (that is to say, not ordinary immorality which exists at all times, but a denial or inversion of morality) and aesthetic corruption had affected sections of the intelligentsia since early in the 20th century, but in the 1960s it began to affect the lives of the entire population, creating a radically false, inverted or Tamasic society."

I have never cared for Mrs. Woolf. Leaving aside her wishy-washy ideas, a so-called intellectual who cannot get her head around the fallacy of post hoc, ergo prompter hoc isn't worth the candle.
Jutta



Apr 28th, 2005 - 9:02 PM
Re: An Article for Literary Sagettes

Dear Madams,
please excuse my callow question. But would any of you be so kind and explain to me what an Aristasian bluestocking is?

Sincerely
Jutta
Miss Drusilla



Apr 28th, 2005 - 9:18 PM
Re: An Article for Literary Sagettes

According to Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable:

Blue Stocking: A female pedant. In 1400 a society of ladies and gentlemen was formed at Venice, distinguished by the colour of their stockings, and called della calza. It lasted till 1590, when it appeared in Paris and was all the rage among the lady savantes. From France it came to England in 1780, when Mrs. Montague displayed the badge of the Bas-bleu club at her evening assemblies. Mr. Benjamin Stillingfleet was a constant attendant of the soirees. The last of the clique was Miss Monckton, afterwards Countess of Cork, who died 1840, but the name has survived.

In this day and age, "bluestocking" or "bas bleu" means simply an intellectual girl. The modifier "Aristasian" was used because because most of the girls here are Aristasian to a greater or lesser degree; but perhaps you arrived from elsewhere?
Miss Drusilla



Apr 28th, 2005 - 9:28 PM
Re: An Article for Literary Sagettes

"Post hoc, ergo prompter hoc" ought to read "post hoc, ergo propter hoc" -- and you will all stop s******ing at the idea that even prefects occasionally make typographical errors.
Miss Drusilla



Apr 28th, 2005 - 9:31 PM
Re: An Article for Literary Sagettes

Bravenet and I will have to agree to disagree: it considers the word s-n-i-g-g-e-r-i-n-g offensive, whereas I wish to suppress only the act itself!
Jutta



Apr 28th, 2005 - 10:02 PM
Re: An Article for Literary Sagettes

Miss Drusilla,
thank you very much for your comprehensive elaboration.

Jutta




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