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Annya



May 2, 05 - 5:47 PM
The Great Musical Quiz

I thought we should re-start the Musical Quiz. As usual all songs are from the Real World (generally not later than mid-60s). One should both answer the question and identify the song - one point for each. So who will be the first to earn some of those lovely juicy points?

Here we go!

1) Since nothing could be finer than dinner in the diner, where does one eat one's ham and eggs?

2) Where do the folks eat possum till they can't eat no more? Which of course, means that they can eat some more, but I am not responsible for songwriters' double negatives.

3)With what does one fall in love without needing a shove?

ONE-POINTERS:

For one point, name the song where:

4) Elevated masses of water-vapour promote laughter.

5) Jam and bread make up a musical note.
Miss B*X



May 2nd, 2005 - 6:00 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

5)I think it could be Doe A Dear!?
Annya



May 2nd, 2005 - 6:11 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Absolutely spot-on, Miss B*.

The very first point awarded in the New Great Musical Quiz goes to you!

Congratulations
Miss B*X



May 2nd, 2005 - 6:16 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

hurrah! It's nice to have a point!
Isabel Trent



May 2nd, 2005 - 6:20 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

I have a point. But my hat usually covers it.
Miss B*X



May 2nd, 2005 - 6:34 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

.....Luckily restrained myself from a riposte that could be a tad too Brunette for mixed company!.....
Princess Mushroom



May 2nd, 2005 - 6:58 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

How mysterious. I have sunburned my lip and my brunette suggested that my lips were still feeling dry and sore because of dehydration, I explained that it was only the outer edge of my lower lip that was sore.

"Oh, I see," she said, "and when you are wearing your big sun-hat that is the only part that stiands out far enough to get sunburned.

I must confess I felt like rather a freak in the ambulance when I was whisked of to hospitters on the night before America. The Ambulance-wallah was questioning the brunette as I sat transfixed by agony:

"She looks very pale."

"Hmm ... yes, she is a bit paler than normal."

"And her lips look very swollen."

"Oh no, they are always that size."
Miss Serena



May 3rd, 2005 - 10:01 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

This is a very hard quiz, but I have an answer to no. 1: you eat your ham'n'eggs in Carolina, having travelled on the Chattanooga Choo-Choo!

This, I believe, is the actual name of a train, not just any old train from Chattanooga (which is in Tennessee, right next door to the Carolinas).
Annya



May 3rd, 2005 - 10:25 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Absolutely right, Miss Serena - making you our first two-point winner.

The Aristasian Travellers were in both Tennessee and South Caroline, but they didn't actually get to Chattanooga. Though they spent all their journey in the place referred to in the second question. Big clue.

For those interested here is the verse in question from Chattanooga Choo Choo


You leave the Pennsylvania Station 'bout a quarter to four
Read a magazine and then you're in Baltimore
Dinner in the diner
Nothing could be finer
Than to have your ham an' eggs in Carolina
When you hear the whistle blowin' eight to the bar
Then you know that Tennessee is not very far
Shovel all the coal in
Gotta keep it rollin'
Woo, woo, Chattanooga there you are
Alana Jolson



May 4th, 2005 - 12:11 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Do I detect a reference to one of mine in question three?

"I didn't need a shove, I just fell in love
With your pretty Baby Face."

Could it be? It might be worth the humiliation of defeat just to know that folks have been reminded about that face of yours.
Miss Primrose Porter



May 4th, 2005 - 12:14 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

I am in a place "lonesome and drear" where the cook's acting ********* Where am I?

Please don't come without the necessaries if you plan to join me!
Miss Primrose Porter



May 4th, 2005 - 12:16 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Oh dear! I have been censored - It's an outrage!!

The missing word is "Queue, you, double eeeee, are" I hope the machine can't work that out.
Annya



May 4th, 2005 - 12:21 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Quite right, Miss Jolson. Baby face it is.

Not sure about your comments upon one's face. I shall refrain from comment on yours unti after you wipe all that burnt cork off and I can see it properly!

In the meantime, two points to you, ma'am!
Miss Jolson



May 4th, 2005 - 2:46 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

OOH! Thank you for the points - what fun!

I must just register my slight surprise at your having resisted calling me "ma'ammy" but am grateful for your very respectful "ma'am" nevertheless.
Daphne D.



May 4th, 2005 - 9:49 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Question 2: Answer - Dixie, a.k.a. the Southern States. Song: Is It True What They Say about Dixie?

While away from the quiz, I was thinking I had to answer the question - is it true... that they eat possum 'till they can't eat no more. I did some research, never having been there, and came to the conclusion that while oppossum is sometimes eaten, it is not among the favourite dishes. These appear to be: sweet potato pie, jambalaya, biscuits and gravy, cheese grits, gumbo, pineapple sandwiches, swamp cabbage and fried fish with beer hushpuppies.
Rattlesnake and alligator are also mentioned, but I feel these must be eaten out of bravado rather than with gusto.
Annya



May 4th, 2005 - 11:30 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Utterly correct, Miss D. Two points to you.

The relevant verse is the first:

Is it true what they say about Dixie
Does the sun really shine all the time
Do the sweet magnolias blossom at everybody's door
Do the folks keep eating possum til they can't eat no more


Though some people prefer the dialectical do' and mo' to "door" and "more". Rather along the lines of the Mammy who had three chidren called Eeny, Meeny and Miny, and she didn't want no mo'.

Congratters on entering the Geat Table of point-scorers, which no doubt our Revered Brunette management will entabulate for s in due course.
Princess Mushroom



May 4th, 2005 - 12:04 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Having just returned from thhe aforementioned Dixie, I can confirm Miss Daphe's research.

I have eaten jambalaya (more Louisiana, I think, than general Dixie food) as well as gumbo. I have had biscuits and sausage gravy, which were excellent, as well as cheesy biscuits and even (in Foley, Alabama) fried biscuits. For English (and perhaps even Yankee) reader, I should explain that these biscuits are not what we mean by biscuits at all, but something a little more akin to scones. Imagine scones with a whiteish sausage-impregnated sauce and you will have some idea of biscuits and sausage gravy.

I have eaten alligator in New Orleans. This is by no means an act of desperation. It is very palatable. It tastes somewhat fishy, I am told, but has a firmish texture. I say "I am told" because my coldy-infection was so bad by then that I could hardly taste it. However the rest of my party gave alligator the thumbs-up and I certainly liked it insofar as I was able to appreciate it.

Cheese grits are, in my view excellent. I ate them in good health on Tybee Island and elsewhere. They are best combined with bacon, pancakes, maple syrup and - well, why not a biscuit with some sausage gravy?

Sweeet-potato pie? Not quite, but I have had sweet-potato pecan praline, which passes for a vegetable side-dish in Dixie but anywhere else would be considered a sweetmeat. The same may be said of cheesey baked apple, which is sprinkled with brown sugar and baked to a sort of brulee.

Fried fish I have had and (I blush to admit) with beer. Hush-puppies and pineapple sandwiches, regrettably, are outside my experience.

Rattlesnake I have not eaten, though we did come uncomfortably close to a live cottonmouth in the Mississipi swamplands.

Catfish is another Southern speciality. We ate catfish on a hot roof in Memphis, Tennessee. It wasn't tin though.

Possum is definitely a food for po'folks. We did have a po'boy in New Orleans, but that is quite another thing. A sort of baguette, really.

We did at one point see a dead opossum on the road, but we did not eat it.

At least, I suppose it was dead. Apparently they can be quite deceptive in these matters.
Miss Drusilla



May 4th, 2005 - 8:08 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

I am still waiting for the photograph of the Mushroom and the Alligator.

As of even date, here is where we stand:

Miss B, 1 point
Miss Serena, 2 points
Daphne D., 2 points
Miss Jolson, 2 points

Open Questions:

1) Elevated masses of water-vapour promote laughter. -- 1 point

2) "I am in a place "lonesome and drear" where the cook's acting q-u-e-e-r." -- 2 points, presumably, as no one has been clever enough to answer it yet.
Miss Prism



May 4th, 2005 - 10:21 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

It should, of course, be "the cook's acting queerly. The censorship of this terrible grammar is entirely proper.
Miss Drusilla



May 4th, 2005 - 10:47 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Quite right, Miss Prism. The only reason I partook of such grammar was that there was an outside chance it might have been intentional.
Miss Prism



May 5th, 2005 - 12:04 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Of course, my dear. I am sure those are the words of the song. I am just not surprised if the club's mechanism revolts at such poor grammar! Being a mere machine it cannot be expected to understand the extenuating circumstances.
Princess Mushroom



May 7th, 2005 - 12:05 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

I have found the place that is lonesome and drear - not to say morbid where the cook is acting that word we can't say. Not to mention the maid's being cranky (probably a theosophist or a Darwinist or something) The song is the Pub with No Beer and I quote the relevant passages below. Though it would rhyme better if we were allowed to say that word.

It's lonesome away from your kindred and all
By the camp fire at night where the wild dingoes call,
But there's nothing so lonesome, so morbid or drear
Than to stand in a bar of a pub with no beer.

...

The maid's gone all cranky and the cook's acting - shall we say peculiar.
What a terrible place is a pub with no beer.
Annya



May 7th, 2005 - 4:57 PM
Quicketties

As questions fall like ninepins, new ones are clearly needed. Here to tide us over are two quick ones:

In what song is one enjoined not to be a naughty baby?

In what song is Miss Garbo's remuneration placed side by side with cellophane as a standard of excellence?
Miss Primrose Porter



May 8th, 2005 - 1:19 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Well done, that Mushroom Princess! A point for being brave enough to enter such a miserable establishment as a pub without the water of life - well, of my life anyway.
One Point to you!
Miss Jolson



May 8th, 2005 - 1:26 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

A hit! A very palpable hit!
You asked:
In what song is one enjoined not to be a naughty baby?

The answer, I suggest might be the one that goes,

"Don't be a naughty baby,
Come to Mama,
Come to Mama do.
My sweet embraceable you."

(although the Mama might be a variation on "me" in my own favourite version by the lovely Miss Judy Garland)

I believe it was by the Gershwins and is called "Embraceable you".

Points, points, points, I must have more points. Pleeeaaase!
Princess Mushroom



May 8th, 2005 - 1:31 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Thank you so much. I am delighted to enter the ranks of the pointful. I am not a great afficionado of beer myself, and the water of life is a term usually applied to brandy.

Really though it is more literally applied to whisky, which is a shortening of the gaelic uisce bo - uisce = water and bo = life.
Annya



May 8th, 2005 - 1:44 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

More points it is, miss Jolson. One more anyway - at least I think this was a one-point question.

I fancy, however that it was by Cole Porter (like the sporting pette I am, I say this without Googling, though I shall do so after posting this.

I think this makes you our points leader to date, though I shall not be sure until our Brunette Management confirms it.
Annya



May 8th, 2005 - 1:50 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

You were quite right. It is the Gershwins ("by George Gershwin and his lovely wife Ira" as one enthusuiastic wireless anouncer put it. I bet he was embarrassed when somebody told him). One learns something every day. I had always thought that was a Cole Porter song. The lines:

Just to look at you
My heart grows tipsy in me;
You and you alone

Bring out the gypsy in me.


Seem very Porteresque to me. Ah well, If the Gershwins aren't Porter, they are certainly no small beer, and I am sure no self-respecting pub would be without them!
Miss Juliana



May 8th, 2005 - 1:52 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Thinking about 'threads' on the club I began to consider the idea of this and other "tie-it-up-stuffs". Hence, a question or two:

(1) What happened to my heartstrings when my dear smiled at me?

(2) How shall I appear if you tell me you love me madly?

(3) What ever shall I do do until the day an angel comes along for me?

One point each because they aren't as complex or cryptic as a certain person's ones.

Happy hunting, ladies.
Isabel Trent



May 8th, 2005 - 2:37 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Dear Miss Juliana,

They went ZING! Your heartstrings, that is. ... Is there something you want to tell us, hmm?
Miss Juliana



May 8th, 2005 - 3:06 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Well done indeed, Miss Trent! A point is yours to keep and cuddle forever!

Is there anything I ought to tell you? Nothing, dear girl, except that your own delightful smile had a very similar effect.

Brunette gallantry can sound rather 'slushy' at times, don't you think? Is that why Blondes love it so much?
Princess Mushroom



May 9th, 2005 - 4:16 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

To your question two, Miss Juliana, the answer must surely be:

You may not be an Angel,
For angels are so few,
But until the day that one comes along.
I'll string along with you.

That last line, by the bye, is the title of the song. Does that count for two points (points, points, POINTS! Gwaahaha!)

As for the other song. Oh dear I know the phrase, I have almost got it. I keep trying to play it in my mind and not quite making it.

By the way, if any of you have never heard I'll String Along with You, do try to. It is one of the most charming little songs ever written, especially when played by a Trentish British dance-band.
Miss Juliana



May 9th, 2005 - 9:54 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Your answer is absolutely correct, young mushroom. Your zealousness with the points is, however, a touch optimistic!

ONE point to the Princess please Miss Management.
Carina



May 12th, 2005 - 9:21 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

The question about Miss Garbo and the cellophane: that's You're the Top, which is by Cole Porter, surely. It's a great song, and reminds me of that strange poem by Ogden Nash which includes the lines "I love you more than a grapefruit squirts... I love you more than a hangnail irks" or words to that effect.

If I may contribute a few questions:
1) Where should you not sit with anyone else but me?
2) Where does Spider Murphy play the tenor saxophone?
3) Where do the butterflies all flutter up and kiss each little buttercup?
Johannah



May 12th, 2005 - 5:57 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Don't sit under the apple tree with anyone else but me!

I believe that's Glenda Miller. My first Music Quiz point. I'm so Excited.

~Johannah
Miss Drusilla



May 12th, 2005 - 8:09 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

The new rankings and the list of open questions follow. I should be pleased if any girl posing new questions would be so kind as to indicate how many points a correct answer ought to receive.

Miss Jolson, 3 points
Princess Mushroom, 2 points
Miss Serena, 2 points
Daphne D., 2 points
Miss B, 1 point
Isabel Trent, 1 point
Carina, 1 point
Johannah, 1 point

Open Questions:

1) Elevated masses of water-vapour promote laughter. -- 1 point

2) How shall I appear if you tell me you love me madly? - 1 point

3) Where does Spider Murphy play the tenor saxophone? - 1 point?

4) Where do the butterflies all flutter up and kiss each little buttercup? - 1 point?
Annya



May 12th, 2005 - 9:09 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Absolutely right, dear Carina, and it is by Cole Porter. The rather haunting lines are:

You're the purple light
Of a summer night
In Spain.
You're the National Gallery,
You're Garbo's salary,
You're cellophane.

Cellophane, you see, is held in rather high regard in Trent.

Incidentally, I heard a song some while ago which I have never managed to find since, which contained the lines:

Wouldn't it be just dandy
And relaxing to the brain
If, just like gum and candy,
Love came wrapped in cellophane.

Does anyone here know the song - or, better still, have a copy thereof?
Carina



May 12th, 2005 - 10:21 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Thank you, Annya, for my point, and thank you, Johannah, for answering my question. It is an oddly satisfying feeling having one's question answered, just like when the dog brings the stick back. I hope that doesn't sound rude!

It's not a very trustful song, is it? Though it's good to know that the demands aren't all one-sided as the song later demonstrates:

Watch those girls on foreign shores,
You'll have to report to me
When you come marchin' home

Don't hold anyone on your knee, you better be true to me
You better be true to me, you better be true to me
Don't hold anyone on your knee, you're gettin' the third degree
When you come marchin' home

You're on your own where there is no phone
And I can't keep tabs on you
Be fair to me, I'll guarantee
This is one thing that I'll do
I won't sit under the apple tree with anyone else but you
'Til you come marchin' home


After that, I suppose, all bets are off!
Princess Mushroom



May 13th, 2005 - 12:12 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

It is in the jailhouse, of course, that Spider Murphy plays the tenor saxophone. And the whole rhythm section is the Purple Gang, if I remember rightly.

The song is Jailhouse Rock made famous by Elvira Presley.

Two points this time? Please? Pretty please?
Carina



May 13th, 2005 - 11:05 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

I never did indicate how many points I was offering for my questions, but I suggest two points should only be awarded when the answer to the question is not actually contained in the title of the song. In this case, I am sorry, Your Shroomness, but although you have correctly identified the song, you only win one point. You will be disappointed to learn that you might have won another point if you had said not "the jailhouse" but "the county jail". I believe you have the dubious honour of the first wrong answer, even though it was nearly right.

I wonder how purple the Purple Gang are? Deep purple?
Carina



May 19th, 2005 - 9:52 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

About Jailhouse Rock: I realise there are no jails in Aristasia, but reading between the lines, if this one was, the warden would certainly have been a blonde. Such a blonde idea... if you get wind of a jailbreak, throw a party so they won't want to leave!

Some more questions:

1)Who "gets blue and goes cuckoo like the clock upon the shelf" and so can't be invited to the party?
2)"I hear the cottonwoods whisp'rin' above...
The ole hootie owl hootie-hoo's to the dove," who's in love?
3)Who's the only girl that Tangerine's fooling?

One point each.
Diana



May 20th, 2005 - 12:02 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

This is the original Diana (I mean as far as this Club is concerned - not the one with the bow and arrow) telling you where butterflies all flutter up and kiss each little buttercup. It is in Carolina. I cannot tell you whether North or South, but I can tell you the time. It is in the morning.
Carina



May 21st, 2005 - 12:19 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Quite correct, Diana. One point to you.

Did you know that there was originally just one Province of Carolina, which then contained parts of Georgia and Tennessee. After 1710 arguments about government caused a split and in 1729 this was formalized, creating North Carolina and South Carolina. They are usually called the Carolinas, but perhaps they are sometimes referred to as "Carolina"? Or perhaps Carolina, Rhode Island or Carolina, Porto Rico is the place in question! Perhaps the morning glories are a clue?

Anyway, I think everyone knows the refrain, but the verses are really very sweet, so I include them in full:

"Carolina, in the Morning"

Wishing is good time wasted,
Still it's a habit, they say;
Wishing for sweets I've tasted,
That's all I do all day.
Maybe there's nothing in wishing,
But speaking of wishing, I'll say:

Nothing could be finer
Than to be in Carolina
In the morning
Nothing could be sweeter
Than my sweetie when I meet her
In the morning.

Where the morning glories
Twine around the door,
Whispering pretty stories
I long to hear once more.

Strollin' with my girlie
Where the dew is pearly, early
In the morning.
Butterflies all flutter up
And kiss each little buttercup
At dawning.

If I had Aladdin's lamp
For only a day,
I'd make a wish
And here's what I'd say:

Nothing could be finer
Than to be in Carolina
In the morning.
Miss Serena



May 28th, 2005 - 8:38 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

I heard the song last night and something rang a bell; ah, yes, that's who wasn't invited to the party - it was Lulu! Though I think that even without the change of heart she would have gone to that party! Anyway I looked up the relevant verse, which is...

You can bring Pearl, she's a darn nice girl,
But don't bring Lulu!
You can bring Rose with the turned-up nose,
But don't bring Lulu!
Lulu always wants to do
What the folks don't want her to.
When she struts her stuff around,
London bridge is falling down!
You can bring cake or a porterhouse steak,
But don't bring Lulu!
Lulu gets blue and goes cuckoo
Like the clock upon the shelf.
She's the kind of smarty breaks up every party,
Hullabaloo loo, don't bring Lulu,
I'll bring her myself!


I am inspired to set a question myself; I think it is a very easy one, but perhaps everyone thinks that.

What will I be doing on the twelfth of never?
Miss B*X



May 28th, 2005 - 2:27 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

"I'll still be loving you".....?
Rosa Renard



May 28th, 2005 - 9:11 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Or rather, you'll still be loving me. Or maybe not. As I recall, the lyrics say "Until the twelfth of never, I'll still be loving you". So yes, on the eleventh of never. But on the twelfth? Perhaps that's when the loving stops. Time to take a breather, to change partners, to quote another song. But perhaps that is too cynical altogether. Do you remember the lovers in The Pirates of Penzance who promise to love each other "until we wed... and even after"?

Perhaps we need a moderator? Miss Drusilla?
Miss Serena



May 29th, 2005 - 7:50 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Oh dear, how worrisome! I should like to give Miss B*X a point, but I am not sure now. I shall have to think about it. If only I had said the Eleventh of Never!
Daphne D.



May 30th, 2005 - 8:06 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

I believe the answer to Carina's question about the cottonwoods and the hootie-owl is Tammy.
Tammy! Tammy! Tammy's in love!" sung by the very young and lovely Debbie Reynolds of Quirinelle Dixie, if that's its proper name.
Carina



May 31st, 2005 - 8:54 AM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Very good, Miss D, 1 point to you, also a belated point to Miss Serena for Lulu. You are quite right, she would have gone to the party:

You can bring peas and crackers and cheese,
But don't bring Lulu!
When she gets sore and slams the door
The plates fly off the shelf.
She can make a feller wild on sarsaparilla.
Hullabaloo loo, don't bring Lulu,
She'll come here herself.


Who brings peas to a party?
Miss Drusilla



May 31st, 2005 - 5:44 PM
Re: The Great Musical Quiz

Please accept my apologies for my absence of late; I just had a hectic weekend at the conclusion of which a cat I neither own nor like especially gave me a mild yet aggravating case of poison ivy. For once I am in agreement with Lady Glossop.

To the girls pondering suitable activities for the twelfth of never: I am inclined to give Miss B the point, as she obviously knew the song in question, and if there was any error it was in the posing of the question. But don't be discouraged, Miss Serena; we are all guilty of misremembering the occasional lyric.

I have resurrected the unanswered questions from our previous musical quiz, to expand our field of operations. Several have been upgraded from one point to two because they have remained unanswered so long. Glance below to see where we stand.

The Brunette Management



Scoreboard:

Miss Jolson, 3 points
Princess Mushroom, 3 points
Miss Serena, 3 points
Daphne D., 3 points
Miss B, 1 point
Isabel Trent, 1 point
Carina, 1 point
Johannah, 1 point
Diana, 1 point



Open Questions:

1. Elevated masses of water-vapour promote laughter. -- 2 points

2. How shall I appear if you tell me you love me madly? - 1 point

3. Who's the only girl that Tangerine's fooling? -- 1 point

4. In which song do two people have a Frigidaire, but no cigarettes? - 2 points

5. What other song, sung by Marilyn Monroe as well as Bianca Crosby, mentions Frigidaire and seems to regard it as a sort of chilly substance? - 2 points

6. What song features devices to facilitate the passage of clouds? - 1 point

7. In what song does a lullaby provide geographical information? - 1 point
Miss B*X



May 31st, 2005 - 11:27 PM
Great Musical Quiz

Marilyn?.....Frigidaire?....."I'm through with Love"!
Points! Points!

Clever Miss B*X




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